©
9.4.2014

It doesn’t have to be this way

way,

one way

your way

no way

my way,

water way

gateway,

way

it doesn’t have to be this way

1910-again:

James Abbott McNeil Whistler, Nocturne: Blue and Silver- Cremorne Lights 1872
wynston:

Falling Rockets
amarepervivere:

More?
ufansius:

Thunderhead - Peter Rotter

patrickschierer:

Portuguese Man-Of-War.

The Portugese Man-Of-War is well-known for its deadly sting, but there is a whole other side to the creature rarely seen.

Rather than a single organism, a Man-Of-War is actually a colony of smaller creatures that are genetically identical, highly specialised and band together to create a larger and more complex being.  

Unlike other siphonophores, the Man-Of-War actively propels around the ocean by using its ‘sail’. This specially developed organ allows it to traverse the surface of the sea in search of prey while dangling tentacles hang down as far as nine metres, each with deadly barbs to trap fish and shrimp.

Aaron Ansarov Photography. 

panomphaeus:

Portuguese man-of-war (Physalia physalis) (taken by Eric Rottinger)| Men-of-war are siphonophores: animals made up from multiple organisms rolled into one. In this case, four individual polyps – one forming the buoyant gas-filled head, one that catches small fish and shrimp with whip-like tendrils, and two others that handle the messy business of digestion and reproduction – come together as a single creature. - New Scientist
magic-spelldust:

Untitled by dammmmit
roybds:

Charles de Gaulle airport, Paris
teapalm:

(Tasha Marie) | New York